Blogs

Retiring Well: How to Manage a Change in Lifestyle

Most people look forward to the freedom of retiring from full-time work, but do not know how to handle a change in lifestyle that it brings about. I have often wondered why people are so resistant to change, even when it is positive. Since more brain research is now available on the subject, here is your guide to successfully navigating change, and retiring to a great lifestyle. 

Retirement Truths

Aging is a fact, but how you experience it is your choice.  Many research studies show that life after 50 can be the most treasured time of your life. This happens because life perceptions are more positive and feelings of worry or stress decline.  Research also shows that a fulfilling retirement is impossible without concerted planning, which should extend beyond the requisite financial plan to also encompass your emotional wants, needs and desires based on thoughtful and practical self-reflection.

“Pleasurizing” and Good Business Sense the Focus of ACTE Travel Conference

The Global Education Conference that just took place in New York City on April 10-20, 2011 brought together hundreds of top business travel professionals in search of ideas for improving their clients’ travel experience.

Show me someone who does not think that travel experience cannot be improved, especially if they remember traveling before liquids became suspect and one didn’t have to buy small scissors in bulk.

Two great themes emerged at the conference this year: pleasurizing and good business sense. Jesse Shell, Chief Executive Officer and Creative Director of Shell Games gave a speech titled The Games We Play: Using Games to Influence Consumer Behavior. Stephen J. Dubner, the co-author of Freakonomics and Superfreakonomics made a keynote presentation on Business and Management Lessons from Superfreakonomics.

Retirement planning and net worth

12 Insights into Being a Great Radio Guest

It was Sunday night last December, and I was feeling uneasy. My WCBS New York radio appearance was scheduled for the next morning. It was to be pre-recorded and aired on the Morning Drive program every morning, five days in a row. My only problem was that I was not great at doing radio.

I certainly knew my stuff, but my ability to deliver the message needed improvement. I was nervous. I couldn’t explain my points clearly and succinctly. On top of that, doing a radio interview meant speaking into the phone with no person in front of me, with no visual cues to adjust based on their feedback. I always imagined being in a studio and it was a revelation to me that radio guests could call in from home.

I was sipping cocktails at my friend’s place, as pictures of impending doom were flashing in my mind brighter than Times Square lights.  “I don’t like having to compress my research into soundbites,” I complained to my friend Kim Klein.

Everyone Has Something to Offer, Don’t Ever Stop Giving and Sharing

 Have you been telling yourself “Mentoring sounds nice, but I am not a big shot    corporate success story… what do I have to offer?” Let me tell you a story.

  About a year ago, I overheard two Hispanic men on the subway having a conversation     in Spanish. One appeared to be in his 70s while the other was perhaps in his 30s. The       older gentleman was listening empathetically as the younger man talked about how       unhappy he was at work job and how a friend in the same boat approached him about starting a business together.  “He wants me to do this thing with him”, the young man explained, “I don’t know if that is the right thing to do. I mean, I’ve never run a business before. I suppose I should, but I can’t afford to lose money right now.  And what if it doesn’t work?…and our friendship; doesn’t that put strain on it?”  He went on and on, practically convincing himself he should not consider the opportunity after all.

How to Become a Mentor: Your First Step

The idea of a “network of mentors” is an alternative to the traditional practice of having one primary mentor-protégé connection. Here are some things to think about to help integrate mentorship in your life:

1. Identify your strongest skills (financial literacy, sports, career coaching, etc).

2. Think about what type of mentor role you would like to play. For example, do you want to be:  

a. A sounding board for ideas and concerns  

b. An advisor to identify career-related skills, interests and values  

Searching for a Retirement Paradise: Seven Attitudes of a Person Finding their Perfect Lifestyle

Ernst & Young reported in July 2008 that three out of five (60%) middle class retirees would outlive their financial assets if they didn’t cut back on spending significantly.  As more and more people consider this reality, they begin to search for options that guarantee a peace of mind that comes from knowing that they are not going to run out of resources. 

While some people take the attitude that cutting back on spending in retirement is a negative thing, I dedicate this article to the brave souls who welcome the challenge and venture out to explore the world no matter the budget. Do you think it might be you? You will find out soon enough by trying on these seven qualities of a person who would be happy picking up and landing somewhere in a tropical paradise with cheap food and housing (and believe me, there’s a bunch of people already sitting there).

For the past ten years, I have been preoccupied with a question: what does it take to be joyful and fulfilled at any age, especially after 50? By now, I interview people wherever I go as a matter of habit, and so when I celebrated this New Year in Costa Rica, I jumped at the chance to meet with the local experts and find out what is going on with the U.S. retirement community there. I spoke with Christopher Howard, who wrote a best-selling book on retiring in Costa Rica; Robert Shannon, who sells retirement properties mostly in “prestige” gated communities and George Lundquist, who offers tours called “retire on social security.” Since all three of them take people on retirement tours and have the benefit of watching thousands of Americans come in and out of the country, I knew they would come with something interesting to say. Their opinions were nothing like what I expected!

While I assumed that money was the primary motivator for anyone venturing a move to Central America, I was completely wrong about that. It turns out that the key to success is finding the right lifestyle – and saving money is just a perk! So, here are the seven attitudes and characteristics shared by people who create a successful lifestyle living in a tropical paradise. Try them on for size – or save a friend the hassle of moving there and back if you can see it is not for them!

1. Do you love nature?